Lenten Art Exhibitions: Remember, Loved and Lost and Forsaken

Published: 01 March 2019

During Lent we will be exhibiting three artworks in different parts of the Cathedral. On the North Wall of the Nave, below the Regiment Chapel, photographer Simon Bray will be exhibiting part of his LOVED&LOST, behind the High Altar, Artist in Residence, Stephen Raw will be exhibiting a new artwork printed from an original painting in watercolour, called ‘Remember’ and in the Jesus Chapel, Philip Wharton’s sculpture ‘Forsaken’ will return to the altar there..

Of ‘Remember,’ Stephen Raw writes:

The artwork hanging behind the High Altar has been especially created for this Ash Wednesday service. It will remain here until the end of Lent. While attending the Cathedral's Ash Wednesday services, I have always been struck by the constant repetition of the words ‘Remember thou art dust. . .’ said to each participant as they came to be ‘ashed’. As a textual artist, I am interested in what happens when aural, fleeting language becomes visible and fixed. In making this artwork my hope is that the experience of hearing the words AND seeing them will have a different, creative effect on participants from if the words were only spoken or only seen. (If anyone attending the Ashe Wednesday service wants to share their experience or thoughts with me, please email me at info@stephenraw.com).

As part of this artwork, the Cathedral will have an ‘ashing station’ outside the Lady Chapel, where people will be able to ash themselves throughout the Lenten season.


Simon Bray explains that LOVED&LOST

… is a documentary project by Manchester based artist Simon Bray that invites participants to explore their experience of loss. Each participant is asked to find a photograph of themselves with their lost loved one. We return to the location of the original photograph to replicate the image and record an interview. It is a chance to think back and remember, to tell the story of that day and of the person that they have lost. Imagery allows for expression beyond what we can speak of, an experience that contributes to the restorative process in overcoming the painful impact of loss. This project provides a platform, allowing others to acknowledge their loss, to celebrate the person they love and to show that the loss that they’ve experienced does not have control over their identity.

All of these stories and many others are hosted on the project website, where you can read the full interviews, watch the films and also find out more about participating. See www.lovedandlostproject.co.uk

Philip Wharton’s ‘Forsaken,’ was much appreciated when it was exhibited during Lent 2018, and returns by popular request. As part of a crucifix, it holds before us the central message of Lent and Easter: ‘Jesus loved us and gave his life for us.’

Remember will be on display until 18 April.

Loved&Lost will be on display until 27 April.
 

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